President Obama's inaugural address. Discuss.

My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because we the people have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebears, and true to our founding documents.

So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land — a nagging fear that America's decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America — they will be met.

On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of shortcuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted — for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things — some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.

For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sanh.

Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions — that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.

For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act — not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions — who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them — that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. Those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account — to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day — because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control — and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gross domestic product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart — not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our founding fathers ... our found fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience's sake. And so to all the other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more.

Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort — even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus — and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West — know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to the suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world's resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment — a moment that will define a generation — it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter's courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent's willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends — hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism — these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility — a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.

This is the source of our confidence — the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed — why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent Mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America's birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:

"Let it be told to the future world ... that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive...that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet (it)."

America, in the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God's grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.

Thank you. God bless you. And God bless the United States of America.

Comments

  • gianfalco (unverified)
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    Obama inauguration as a sliding door...

  • (Show?)

    Eloquent and spot on. We have big challenges ahead. Much more that just getting out of the current economic downturn. We need big, bold changes that will hard. Obama is rallying us. Listen to him. I agree with Tom Friedman today (here) that we need radical changes. In a similar spirit, I've agree with Rupert Murdock that we, like Australia, need to rediscover our pioneering, frontier spirit ( here ). Here in Oregon the two big changes I promote (a substantial, revenue neutral gas tax and substantial expansion of Mandarin and study abroad in China programs) will not be easy. They are about more than getting our economy running. They are, like Obama's call to us, about setting our course for the future. Great speech!

  • (Show?)

    My favorite lines from the speech:

    On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.

    And...

    What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them — that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. Those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account — to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day — because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.

    Now THAT is change I can believe in!

  • (Show?)

    For me it is too early to tell whether this is a speech that we will remember in 10 years or not. I thought that Obama's speech on race last spring was such a speech. He addressed a fundamental issue for America in a way that had never been done before by a candidate for President. While I liked his Inaugural address, I like almost all his speeches so for me the question is whether it will stand out over time. I just don't know today.

  • Bill Bodden (unverified)
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    Time will tell whether this was a speech outlining America's path to a better world - or just talk. That Palestinian President Mahmud Abbas, a man with a reputation for corruption and selling out, was the first "world leader" he called is cause for skepticism.

  • Bramy Garazowe (unverified)
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    He addressed a fundamental issue for America in a way that had never been done before by a candidate for President.

  • Bramy Garazowe (unverified)
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    He addressed issue for America in a way that had been done before by a canddidate for President.

  • Zarathustra (unverified)
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    Nice address; if followed up it will be historic.

    One nit, though.

    We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things

    "Our Scripture", or "Christian Scripture", please. The assumption that this is a "Christian nation", like the invocation, should also be the brunt of the statement, "the time has come to set aside childish things".

  • (Show?)

    I expected to be inspired and I found it somewhat ho hum. At the Western Ball, I got a lot more inspired.

  • alex gregory (unverified)
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    Back Obama's {dare I say First} Inaugural Address will be remembered as one of the greatest political speeches in US History; certainly as a 21st Century reaffirmation of core US values and rejection of late-20th Century political and economic theory. The Obama administration is the beginning of the next Century in US politics, and return to the compact between the US government and its people.

    The speech is by far the most influential speech Barrack Obama has made to date since the scope and impact are so much more than any speech has has given to date.

    For me, the following is the whole point of this great American speech:

    "Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends — hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism — these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility — a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.

    This is the price and the promise of citizenship."

  • Jim H (unverified)
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    Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath.

    I cringed here knowing, of course, that he is the 43rd American taking the oath. He wasn't alone here though, Rick Warren also said in his invocation that this was America's 44th transfer of power. Again, one too many.

    A nit-picky item maybe, but being a numbers guy it stuck out like a sore thumb for me.

  • (Show?)

    To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

    This is one of the lines I will remember for a while.

    On the whole, I think it started off pretty good, but was a bit flat by the end. I'm with Paul in thinking it was ho-hum. His speech in Philly was much better.

  • Chris Lowe (unverified)
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    I liked that President Obama reintroduced equality into public discourse in a plain prominent way as one of the fundamental values, which is was and should be. For too long it has been only a cramped and ungenerous misrepresentation of "freedom" standing alone.

    Open here:

    "all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness."

    A bit more implicit here:

    "The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified,"

    Likewise it was good to see his invocation of the common good and of citizenship in its various dimensions.

    <hr/>

    This I find a bit worrisome: "our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age," especially followed shortly by saying "our healthcare is too costly." This sounds like potentially laying the groundwork for elitist, anti-people "entitlement reform" of a sort already being urged upon him by the David Brookses of the country. They want him to play the Nixon to China role in getting what W couldn'a achieve in 2005, to play his thematics against "old politics" and for bipartisanship for selling out Social Security and Medicare.

    The actual hard choice would be to commit ourselves to meeting the human needs of the elderly even when it's demographically more difficult. (Of course, if we change policy to capture more revenue dedicated to sustaining their old age from baby boomers while they are in their highest earning years we could smooth out some of the demographic difficulty.)

    But maybe that's not what the president meant. Later on he spoke of "care they can afford."

    So the question is, too expensive in what sense? Too expensive for poor and middle class people to afford? More expensive than it needs to be because of stupid inefficient private bureaucracy and excessive profit demands? Or too expensive in terms of the ideologies of what an economy should look like from the point of view of great wealth?

    This is just empirically wrong: "wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost." There's a fraction of gain to made with medical information technology that could do both. But healthcare economists will tell you that a key driving force in rising healthcare costs new medical technologies that are costly and whose costs rise much faster than general inflation.

    The parts of the international section that look toward an ethic of security through mutual development and that recognize a need for the wealthy world to change our consumption habits are encouraging.

  • (Show?)

    He wasn't alone here though, Rick Warren also said in his invocation that this was America's 44th transfer of power. Again, one too many.

    Actually that was correct.

  • Jim H (unverified)
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    Kevin, Only if you count Washington's first inauguration as a transfer of power. But then, you could also include any transfers of power under the Articles of Confederation.

    Otherwise, for example, after John Adams' swearing in (#2 President) there was 1 transfer of power.

  • Harry Kershner (unverified)
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    "Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred."

    This is insipid, Bushist dogma. We are at "war" for the control of others' resources, for the continuing wealth of those who have profited from the Bush-Obama bailouts, and for the continuing power of the military-industrial-government complex.

    "...we are ready to lead once more."

    If we have learned anything (which I doubt), we will join in democratic alliances with others rather than annoint ourselves as their leaders.

    "We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan."

    A principled postion is that we will immediately begin a return to home of all corporate and military personnel, and begin to pay reparations for the holocaust we have visited on the Iraqi and Afghani people. The train of criminality has passed from one hegemonist to another. All those future Americans who will ask in wonder why Bush and Cheney were allowed to escape punishment for their crimes should understand that both parties are now involved in the same criminal conspiracies.

    "We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense"

    This is perhaps the most obvious point of agreement between the DP and the RP. Our way of life is shameful; it is a way of dominance of others and their resources through slaughter, torture, and destruction. No apology? We owe a lot of people a really good apology.

  • Unrepentant Liberal (unverified)
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    I think it was a spot on address that captured the moment in history we are at. It was not as entertaining or providing of memorable sound bites as his campaign speeches are but this was a more serious moment than a routine political address.

    I don't think he necessarily wanted two million people chanting "Obama, Obama, Obama" at such a momentous and historic occasion.

  • Chris Lowe (unverified)
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    On the numbers, the oath has been administered many more times than 44 due to multi-term presidencies. Yet though we speak of 44 presidencies & treat continuous multi-term presidencies as single ones, Grover Cleveland's split terms get counted as two, so we have 44 presidencies and 43 presidents. But Cleveland's inaugurations each were transfers of power from presidents of a different party.

    I would maintain that Washington's swearing in represents the first transfer of power to a president under this Constitution. It was a transfer of power from not only a previous leader but a previous form of government. It would be the first one using an oath of office swearing to uphold the Constitution (not sure what form of executive existed under the Articles of Confederation, but any oath wouldn't have been to uphold the Constitution).

    Rick Warren was wrong, but not because of the number 44. He said "Now today we rejoice not only in America's peaceful transfer of power for the 44th time."

    However, this misrepresents the transfers of power caused by assassinations of Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley & Kennedy. And whether we should count the beginning of Lincoln's first term as a "peaceful transfer of power," since it precipitated a civil war, seems at least open to question.

  • Chris Lowe (unverified)
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    There are some things I'd put a bit differently, and some predictions that are plausible or likely but not certain, but unfortunately for our country Harry K. is closer to right than wrong in his critique.

    Speaking of predictions by President Obama rather than Harry, this one "[we will] forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan" seems hubristic at best and to have a distinct potential to become Orwellian double-speak.

    This one "We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people" is weaselly, double qualified by "begin" and "responsibly," and read in conjunction with Obama's stated policy intentions, not entirely true since he has said he plans to maintain several tens of thousands of troops in Iraq. Maybe Bush's SOFA won't allow that after all, though on the other hand it protracts the timeline beyond Obama's.

  • Bill Bodden (unverified)
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    To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

    Yet, the first "world leader" Obama called was Mahmud Abbas, the Palestinian Fatah's leader who has a reputation for corruption. Fatah leaders, Arafat and Abbas, never had any qualms about silencing dissent in the Palestine Territories.

  • Patrick Story (unverified)
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    At last, bin Laden's worst nightmare has come true. "You cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you." In President Obama, bin Laden now faces a president who is smarter than he is, and has more worldwide respect. And unlike the Bush family, Obama has no special obligation to the Saudi royal family, which may have pressed Bush for no final reckoning with bin Laden. But now our worst enemy's days are surely numbered.

  • peter hall (unverified)
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    I'm glad to see he mentioned unbelievers as citizens. The final barrier to true representation of all people in America will be broken when an unbeliever (atheist, agnostic, pagan) can take the oath of office with no bible and no so help me God. There would be no prayer service the next day and certainly no invocation. Running the country has nothing to do with God. I wish politicians could save their religion for private moments and events, but could such a person get elected? Overall I liked it, especially the subtle digs at the Bushies, although they probably didn't get it.

  • Zarathustra (unverified)
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    Posted by: Patrick Story | Jan 21, 2009 4:50:54 PM

    At last, bin Laden's worst nightmare has come true. "You cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you." In President Obama, bin Laden now faces a president who is smarter than he is, and has more worldwide respect. And unlike the Bush family, Obama has no special obligation to the Saudi royal family, which may have pressed Bush for no final reckoning with bin Laden. But now our worst enemy's days are surely numbered.

    That'll take sorting out Kashmir, first. There's no way Pakistan will free up troops for the tribal areas now. Obama said he would consider sending US troops in from Afghanistan, but that's not really practical if Pakistan and India are fighting at the same time.

    Current opinion on the ground is that there is about a 65% chance of the following scenario. In the next month, the high border passes start to thaw and India pushes troops across the Pakistan border. Pakistan retaliates massively, pushing India back. India begins a broader scale invasion of Pakistan, with all it's conventional might and Pakistan retaliates with nuclear weapons. India then nuke Pakistan's major cities. It is a much worse situation than 2002 was, and they have a tendency to not repeat things, over and over. As such, there's a feeling of finally doing this rather than constantly going to the brink.

    This has been left for too long. After the Mumbai bombings, things could have gone either way. When the India's tour of Pakistan for a Test series was called off, that should have been the big warning sign. When Benazir Bhutto returned to Karachi, she said she had come back to save Pakistan. That didn't happen. Nice that BO (the prez) got on the horn to the Mid East players right away, but this is rather pressing too. We can't just watch the sand run out of the hour glass. Unless the international community intervenes massively, and now, I really believe that Pakistan is not long for this world.

    The fallout, no pun intended, of losing Pakistan, would be unimaginable. We think of Pakistan as a real country, but we have to remember that it hasn't even been 75 years yet, and that India regards its existence as non-sense. There was never a Pakistan in history and modern India was founded on the successful mix of religions. Cutting off a piece and moving most the Muslims there is regarded by many Indians as a pedantic experiment. Thankfully, the US gov can now think this through. Baby Bush probably liked the idea of Iran being hemmed in by Iraq, Afghanistan and India rather than Afghanistan and Iran having a border with Pakistan.

    If I were his speech writer, I would have mentioned Benazir and publicly called on the world to pay attention to the situation in the subcontinent. He could well be Pakistan's saviour and he could have taken on Benazir's mantle during the inaugural address. Jesse Jackson (please make him FCC chair, please, please...) is the only one I've heard talking about this on a regular basis. Go figure.

  • Harry Kershner (unverified)
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    Re: "And unlike the Bush family, Obama has no special obligation to the Saudi royal family..."

    History did not begin in 2000. All U.S. policy makers in my lifetime have had a "special relationship" with the Saudis. Will Obama be the exception to the rule that the U.S. needs to control ME oil? Fat chance.

  • Fidel Castro (unverified)
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    The intelligent and noble face of the first black president of the United States ... had transformed itself under the inspiration of Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King into a living symbol of the American dream.

    No one could doubt the sincerity of his words when he affirms that he will convert his country into a model of freedom, respect for human rights in the world and the independence of other nations.

    What will he do soon, when the immense power that he has taken in his hands is absolutely useless to overcome the unsolvable, antagonistic contradictions of the system?

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