A Tip of the Hat to Street Roots

Dan Petegorsky

At a time when the newspaper industry as a whole is in desperate shape, the growing "street newspaper" movement has become increasingly vibrant.

Portland's Street Roots is part of that movement. Vendors are out now with its May 1 edition, which has a remarkable set of articles focusing on immigrant labor in the economic crisis and on squatters' rights at this time of skyrocketing foreclosures.

So - head on out and pick up a copy. Or pick up a bunch to send to your friends around the state.

Comments

  • Buckman Res (unverified)
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    ”Vendors are out now with its May 1 edition, which has a remarkable set of articles focusing on immigrant labor”...

    That should read “illegal immigrant” labor and the ICE raids at the Del Monte plant.

    Please make the distinction between people who come to this country legally to better their situation and those who flaunt our immigration laws in a greedy quest for money.

  • Frank (unverified)
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    Buckman Res "That should read “illegal immigrant” labor and the ICE raids at the Del Monte plant.

    Please make the distinction between people who come to this country legally to better their situation and those who flaunt our immigration laws in a greedy quest for money."

    Because the REALLY greedy people know the big money isn't in being derivatives trading, it's in picking cabbage.

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    Buchman Res: please take the rants somewhere else; this is a thread to honor Street Roots' fine work.

  • Frank (unverified)
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    I've got a way to send the right wingers running away screaming from this thread, Dan. An excerpt from article that ran in the UK Independent called "American Excess"

    "...I’d been working for UBS for about five weeks when I woke up on the balcony of a ski resort in the Swiss Alps. It was midnight and I was drunk. One of my fellow management trainees was urinating onto the skylight of the lobby below us; another was hurling wine glasses into the courtyard.

    Behind us, someone had stolen the hotel’s shoe-polishing machine and carried it into the room; there were a line of drunken bankers waiting to use it. Half of them were dripping wet, having gone swimming in all their clothes and been too drunk to remember to take them off. It took several more weeks of this before the bank considered us properly trained.

    I didn’t fit the typical profile of a trader. I was an English major working on a novel at night. Most everyone else was a maths or economics major, most everyone else had relatives or family in banking....I put on 45 pounds in my first year at the bank, and, as you might guess, it was not from eating McDonalds. Occasionally I ate stuff like sushi, but mostly it was steak. We went to the good places like Sparks, Peter Luger’s, and the Strip House. We tended to look down on chains like Morton’s and Ruth’s Chris-they were for car dealers or stock brokers, not traders. Regardless of where we ate, we ate in quantity. My standard strategy was to order half a dozen appetisers, plus a steak and lobster, plus a few desserts and much wine as I could drink, as long it was under a few hundred dollars a bottle. Followed by a digestif, typically a 30-year-old port. There’s not any way to justify this except to say I was trying to catch up to my colleagues. We would treat those restaurants like Roman vomitoriums. And it wasn’t the food so much as the wine. Being a junior employee, I couldn’t really order bottles that cost more than a few hundred dollars, but the senior guys could get nicer stuff - Opus One, Chateau Latour. As long as we were out with a client, the bank paid. I remember being stunned the first time I saw a dinner bill for ten grand. But that was just the beginning.

    What it boiled down to was austerity for everyone else and rampant consumption for ourselves. I never saw anyone literally set fire to money, but I did drink most of a bottle of 1983 Margaux ($2,000)...."

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/american-excess--a-wall-street-trader-tells-all-1674614.html

    I've got that one saved as a favorite now to use whenever a right winger starts acting inappropriately

    <hr/>

    Thanks for paying some attention to Street Roots, Dan.

  • meg (unverified)
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    Frank. ?????

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    Meg - I believe Frank was simply providing readers a vision of what a real "greedy quest for money" looks like.

  • Israel Bayer (unverified)
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    Thanks Dan for the Tip of the Hat...

    Both of the articles focus on the hardships immigrants, specifically Latino immigrants are going through in our community. I think our reporters did a fair and fantastic job on both pieces.

  • rw (unverified)
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    <h2>My son and I never walk past a Street Roots vendor, even if they are selling something a year old rescued from a basement. We buy them, read them, send them to friends around the US.</h2>

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