Population-adjusted maps in the Wyden/Huffman race

Kari Chisholm FacebookTwitterWebsite

On Saturday, I posted population-adjusted election-results maps in the Kitzhaber/Dudley race, in order to graphically dismiss the notion that somehow a "small" part of Oregon voted for John Kitzhaber.

Tonight, I've got maps for you in the race for the U.S. Senate race between Senator Ron Wyden and law professor Jim Huffman. Of course, that race wasn't nearly as close as Kitzhaber/Dudley -- Wyden won by a 57 to 38% margin.

That said, the maps are still instructive. If you just looked at a geographic map, you'd be excused for thinking the race was close. After all, other than a few exceptions, the "only" counties Wyden won were in the northwest portion of the state.

But a population-adjusted look at the map, and you see what really happened -- a landslide for Senator Wyden.

Here's the maps:

Comments

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    This is a more clear reflection. I've been impressed with Blue Oregon pointing out that it wasn't Mult. Co. that picked the governor, it was the votes of the whole state.

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    The Wyden/Huffman debate shown in the Southern/Coast/Klamath/North California media market provided one of the best contrasts for voters. Wyden identified high-quality illustrations of his Senate work and votes. The fact that he's been in Jackson County over 500 times while Senator is also a plus.

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    That's only true to a point.

    Take away the 70/30 advantage Dems have in Multnomah County and the outcome is different in the Governor's race, especially if the split more closely matched the percentages of Lane County.

    This map, in my opinion, shows the support Wyden has among voters in Oregon because of his effective leadership, and overall jovial tone. Wyden can certainly ratchet-up the rhetoric if need be, but I find him to be a very pragmatic leader.

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        I'm not arguing that point, Kari, and I agree with what you're saying.

        But it's also true that a majority of the state's population is in one corner of the state, and most of those people happen to be Democrats. So more Conservative issues/candidates will always have a tough (if not impossible) time winning there.

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          In other words, the majority of Oregonians reject conservative issues/candidates. What "corner" of the state the majority of Oregonians live in is fairly irrelevant with regards to statewide elections, etc.

          So the notion that somehow Multnomah County, or "one small corner" of the state thwarted the will of the state in a statewide race is disingenuous and/or misguided thinking/rhetoric.

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            "So the notion that somehow Multnomah County, or "one small corner" of the state thwarted the will of the state in a statewide race is disingenuous and/or misguided thinking/rhetoric."

            I'm sorry, can you tell me where I said that?

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              I didn't say that was what you explicitly said. However that is, whether intended or not, the implication inherent with the "one tiny corner of the state" phrase you used, in conjunction with the "Take away the 70/30 advantage Dems have in Multnomah County and the outcome is different in the Governor's race" as well as the general tone of more than a few who are floating the "Multnomah county thwarted the will of the rest of the state" narrative that IS out there (view some of the Oregonian headlines of the past week for an example).

              As I said, the majority of Oregonians reject conservative issues/candidates. What "corner" of the state the majority of Oregonians live in is fairly irrelevant with regards to statewide elections, etc.

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            The disconnect is in way of life and perceived ignorance to each other. City vs. country. Agricultural vs. technology. Slow and steady vs. fast and fearless. Rural Oregon often feels underrepresented due to always having to go to the city to get heard and never having the city come to them. The one concession was the odd-year sessions. Someone from Baker County or another far-flung part of the state (State Rep/Senator) only had to move to Salem for a couple months every other year (16-hour roundtrip car commute just isn't feasible). Someone from Mult, Wash, or Lane, could easily commute daily and wouldn't have to move. Now, even that is gone.

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    It's great thing that living human beings get to vote and not sage brush and juniper tress.

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    Interesting to note all the counties that voted Dudley but also voted Wyden. Does that say more about Wyden or Kitz?

    I am glad to see that people appear to be looking at each race individually and not just voting party.

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      I think it might have something to do with the Gordon Smith machine being the core of the Dudley campaign. Like it or not, that group of folks are fairly adept at threading the needle to sell a GOP candidate as a "moderate" state-wide. They managed to make a real race of it even though they literally had the most empty of suits as a candidate. I think that is the differentiator compared to the fringeish candidates like Huffman, Robinson, etc.

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        Was Bruun fringe? I don't think you can explain all the split ballots by Dudley's campaign polish.

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          Bruun's positition on privatizing social security and his opposition to unemployment benefits are certainly fringe positions.

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          Bruun lost by a wider margin in a district where all counties except for Lincoln county and the small slices of Benton and Multnomah that make up the district actually went for Dudley.

          Bruun tacked to the right and lost, Dudley tried to portray himself to the left (compared to the rest of the GOP in the state, ala Gordon Smith) and damn near pulled it off.

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    It doesn't matter how many times you post maps like this; Republicans have gotten it into their heads that elections should be decided on the basis of who won more acres of dirt.

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    Bruce,

    Which Republican said that?

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    Kari, Thanks for these enlightening visuals. Now, can you convince the corporate media to do the same for national elections? A lot of empty space on the Great Plains, for example, is competing with the Left Coast for credibility.

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    We can be grateful the Republicans didn't take control of our state. We now have an example in Texas of a GOP governor with a large majority in the legislature. Gov. Perry announced today of his intent to "secede" from Soc. Security. And the legislative leadership is moving forward with a plan to totally withdraw from Medicaid. Medicaid cares for 2/3 of nursing home patients(most of whom are middle class income), most of the mentally ill, the developmentally and physically disabled, and impoverished children. This is the party of amoral extremists and their plan for Oregon and all of America. http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2010/11/6/918258/-Texas-GOP-leaders-want-to-secede-from-Medicare,-Social-Security

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    I think we should just split the State along those lines. People in Portland are not bad people, they have a different view of government so we should allow them to have their own or vice versa with the rest of the State. Its time to split Oregon folks!

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      Another secessionist! Why not go the whole way like your Republican governor in Texas, just secede from the Union. Maybe you could bring back slavery too!

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        The secessionist movement in Southern Oregon/Northern California has a long history. A San Francisco Chronicle reporter won a Pulitzer reporting on it in 1941.

        I spend my days listening to our local public radio station: Jefferson Public Radio.

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    What does a population-adjusted map of the nation look like?

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    Even though the Republican voters in jack rabbit and sage brush country object to the views on government in Lane and Multnomah County they don't object to taking their money to fund schools and essential services. And I thought the rabid right was opposed to redistributionist policies. Turns out it's not true.

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      I don't know too terribly much about jack rabbit and sage brush country, but in forest country we used to fund our schools through timber revenues, until the Endangered Species Act was inveigled to put an end to that. Unlike Multnomah County, more than half of our lands in Jackson County are federally owned and subject to none of the property tax revenue that so enriches your county.

      The federal "Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act" designed to replace that revenue (leaving our overgrown forests unharvested) is now distributed to 41 states, a mockery, a travesty and a political reality.

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