Early rumblings in the Portland Mayor's race

Kari Chisholm FacebookTwitterWebsite

Early rumblings in the Portland Mayor's race

Earl Blumenauer and Eileen Brady

Over at the O, columnist Anna Griffin reveals that New Seasons co-founder Eileen Brady is considering a run for Mayor of Portland.

New Seasons co-founder Eileen Brady said today that she's considering a run for mayor next year and in the process of talking to friends and colleagues about whether to run and what her campaign might look like. "A lot of people have asked me to think about it," she said Tuesday afternoon. "I'm out listening to community members right now, so I don't have much to say besides, yes, I'm looking at it."

Back in 2008, she met with national Democratic leaders as part of her process of considering a run for the U.S. Senate seat held then by Gordon Smith.

Griffin also shares her take on the emerging field of candidates:

Brady, 49, would be a fascinating candidate, and a serious opponent for [Mayor Sam] Adams, Charlie Hales, a former city commissioner who has all but announced his candidacy, or Steve Novick, the political activist and former U.S. Senate candidate said to be considering a run.

A proud Democrat, she's a nationally renowned expert on sustainability. But she would also bring a business owner's perspective to the race, along with the kind of sharp tongue a challenge to Adams, who isn't afraid to play rhetorical hardball, will require. And being a woman certainly wouldn't hurt her chances in Portland, or among a field that seems likely to be dominated by men.

Comments

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    Wow, wouldn't it be great to have a mayor's office as friendly as New Seasons Market. Now, it's about as friendly as a mama bear is to someone poking a stick at her cubs.

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    I know little about Brady. I do enjoy shopping at New Seasons, especially for the out-of-season blueberries from Chile.

    I'm not reassured that she is my type of candidate when I read in Griffin's article that she was "a top pick among downtown business types to run for mayor in 2008." I do not usually share my candidates with the downtown business crowd.

    I'd also like to know her position on the Columbia River Crossing project and whether she would ask Portland Public Schools, in the interest of Portland's economic future, to expand it Mandarin immersion programs and fund a high school study abroad program.

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    Although I have never had a conversation with Eileen longer than hello my biggest concern with her candidacy is the standard of someone with no (to my knowledge) public experience starting at the top. While Bloomberg has shown that it can be done with a much bigger city, even the best and brightest usually have some troubles with the transition from running a business to governing a city with messy political conflicts. Of course a campaign will help sort that out.

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    At the risk of going off topic, what issues will drive your vote in the mayor's race? I ask because I think it's too early to say much about challengers, but it's not too early to think about what should matter.

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      Amen to that, Katy. Current leadership is disconnected from reality. As an example, Adams continually says he is the education candidate, it's at the top of his priority list, but what has he done to address any of the pressing issues facing the various districts in the City of Portland boundaries? Is he even remotely involved? Doesn't seem like it.

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      Using Anna's method of budget analysis, the biggest loser is NE Portland inside of 82nd, with only 0.3% of the federal spending requests, and the big winner is NE Portland, with 76% of the spending requests. If you count downtown as distinct from the city quadrants, NW Portland received no spending requests.

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    The one thing I’d really like to see is more involvement with schools. I don’t think anything affects livability for those with kids more than the quality of public education. And while it isn’t the mayor’s job to lead the schools, leadership there is desperately needed. For starters mayoral candidates could take positions on the two PPS tax measures. Whether they pass or fail, Portland will be affected by them for years to come. I don’t think ambivalence on something that big is an option for those who would assume the city leadership.

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      Sam Adams is on the leadership committee for Portlanders for Schools: http://www.wweek.com/portland/blog-26783-portlanders_for_schools_cross_$500000_mark.html

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      From my point of view, passing the two PPS tax measures would keep Portland Public Schools solidly on the road of status-quo mediocrity. I'm for more change before we give them more money. Our next generations deserve better and will need better to survive. I'd welcome a mayor or mayoral candidates that articulates that. See "Vote No on Both Portland Public School Tax Levies."

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        I think the message that our children will face a "bigger" world then we did and will need an education appropriate to it is one that can't be repeated enough, and I respect your efforts towards that end. But I don't see how losing teachers and ignoring a decaying infrastructure makes reform more likely. Voting against the levies seems much more like a vote for the status quo.

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          BJ, you are asking the right question. Will we get more educational change/reform with or without the levies? Again, from my perspective, it is a sad dilemma with students not getting the education they need whatever happens. But we have so little state or local educational reform leadership. It is so disappointing. Status quo special interests have control of the politics of education. Teachers, IMHO, are bringing some of the hardship on themselves and their students by not playing a more constructive part. Those of us on the outside, left out of the decision making process, are reduced to saying "no" when asked for more money. I think it's going to happen more and more. And I think more real change is apt to come from a double "no" vote than from approving the levies.

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    Nolan, In another article Anna Griffin wrote- "East Portland has the city's fewest sidewalks, paved roads and parks per capita, plus the highest percentages of kids receiving free or reduced lunch. Twenty-eight percent of Portland's population -- and almost half our schoolchildren -- live east of 82nd Avenue. Less than 2 percent of the city's federal stimulus money went to specific projects there." This gives the less than 1% of the federal budget requests in east portland a little more impact, in my opinion.

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    WE THE PEOPLE, reached out to the "Brady Camp" as soon as she filed to become a candidate as Portland's Mayor/Police Superintendent.

    We requested Brady's position re: program, Truly Reforming Law Enforcement attached to Oregon Senate Bill 111 Police Use of Deadly Physical Force?

    Not one response to us from Brady regarding this life and death matter.

    Please Google:

    1. Truly Reforming Law Enforcement.

    2. Rise In Police Brutality USA TODAY Dec. 18, 2007.

    3. Jerry Atlansky Oregon Senate Hearing Bill 111.

    How can Brady expect to win the election if she refuses to protect all people in Portland and the taxpayers millions of dollars for litigation for unjustified police use of deadly physical force?

    Jerry Atlansky-Founder/Chairperson United States Police/Oregon State Police-Independent Citizens Review Board Portland, OR. 97213 [email protected] 24/365

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